A House Still Divided

The Atlantic
October 2018 Issue

In 1858, Abraham Lincoln warned that America could not remain “half slave and half free.” Today, the country remains divided by racism—and the threat is as existential as it was before the Civil War.

Read More
EssaysIbram Kendi
17 Books On Race Every White Person Needs To Read

Despite years of talk about living in a post-racial America, this weekend's violence at the Charlottesville march was a deadly reminder that racism is still alive and well in the modern day United States — and always has been. With images of torch-bearing, weapon-wielding white supremacists, Neo-Nazis, and KKK members filling every television set across the country, it's becoming clear that unless we do something to stop it, the hate and violence emboldened by the current presidential administration will only get worse. A good first step to take? Educating yourself with these books on race all white people should read, because it is up to us to put an end to racism.

Read More
PrintIbram Kendi
A post-Charlottesville reading list to help explain American white supremacy

In the aftermath of the white supremacist “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville this weekend — and all the violence that ensued — a popular response from good white liberals was that #ThisIsNotUs.

In other words: Blatant, violent racism is not a part of the real America. The Charlottesville rally was a perverse aberration, one that the rest of us have no part in.

Read More
PrintJustin Mabee
Washingtonians Process Violence And White Nationalism In Charlottesville, Va.

Over the weekend, supporters of the white nationalist Unite the Right movement gathered to rally in Charlottesville, Va. –a few hours drive from Washington, D.C. The event turned deadly when a driver slammed into the crowd that had gathered to protest the rally, killing one and injuring 19 others. The Saturday rally is one among a growing number of white nationalist rallies in recent months, including at least one in the D.C. region. In the aftermath of the weekend’s terrorism, Kojo explores the history and future of white nationalism in the region.

Read More
Stamped from the Beginning charts the uncomfortable history of American racism

In Between the World and Me (2015), Ta-Nehisi Coates contends that the great question of American history is not whether “Lincoln truly meant ‘government of the people’”, but what America has, from its inception, “taken the political term ‘people’ to actually mean. In 1863, it did not mean your mother or your grandmother, and it did not mean you and me. Thus America’s problem is not its betrayal of ‘government of the people’, but the means by which ‘the people’ acquired their names.” Stamped from the Beginning provides a lucid, accessible survey of how “the people” were racialised over 500 years.

Read More
PrintIbram Kendi
Lincoln's Legacy with Race with Dr. Ibram X .Kendi

We explore Lincoln's legacy with regard to race with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi.  Dr. Kendi earned the 2016 National Book Award for his work Stamped from the Beginning:  A Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America.  We talk about Lincoln's role in the history of racist and anti-racist ideas, Dr. Kendi's book, and about race in America today. 

Read More
ListenJustin Mabee
What would Jefferson say about white supremacists descending upon his university?

Washington Post
August 13, 2017

The statue of Thomas Jefferson looked at them, those several hundred torch-waving men and women marching at the University of Virginia late Friday night in opposition to the city’s plan to remove a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. The protesters and counterprotesters who violently clashed in Charlottesville on Saturday passed by Jefferson’s monuments.

Read More
EssaysIbram Kendi